“This isn’t about the politics. We’re either side of the same sea.” Making The Walk: Across The Water (Calais and Dover) for BBC Radio 4

I live on the coast. I can hear French radio on the car stereo. Ferries leave for France every day. The fishermen here are related, way back in time, to families from Normandy and Spain. We’re nearer to France here than we are to Westminster … yet my town voted for Brexit, by a large majority. The same goes for other towns all along the edge of England, for people living by the side of the Channel. I was fascinated by that and wanted to explore what was going on, in real life, way beyond the headlines and the B-word balls up. I do believe, in general, in the words of the late MP Jo Cox:

“We are far more united and have far more in common than that which divides us.”

I wondered if that was true here and now, in this fraught and divisive moment. And I was lucky, even blessed, that the perceptive Mohit Bakaya at Radio 4 was prepared to commission radio on this theme.

You can listen to The Walk: Across The Water (part one is Calais, part two is Dover) on BBC Radio 4 here. 

So I got together with my partner in radio, the producer Jonathan Mayo, and we devised a two-part documentary that would take us walking through Calais first then Dover, talking and listening to people who live, love, work and play beside and on the stretch of sea that the French call La Manche and that can seem like a bridge on a beautiful clear day, but is almost as often a barrier.

The model was the programme we had done for Radio 4 called The Walk: For Richer, For Poorer, walking through Kensington meeting the very rich and those who were struggling.

The Walk: Across The Water was floated, if you will forgive me, in the Autumn, just as the first reports began to come through of migrants trying to cross the Channel in small boats, having been told by people traffickers that they should try to get here before Brexit closed the doors for good. Men, women and children nearly died in the attempt, but they were rescued by the admirable servants of the Coastguard, the RNLI, the Border Force, the ferries or the fishing fleet. Even as we were researching the programmes, the Home Secretary Sajid David sent more boats to the Channel and declared the migration a national emergency.

I went across to Calais in early January for a research trip with my son Joshua, who has good French. We went to the top of the Calais lighthouse on a terrifyingly windy day, saw the White Cliffs of Dover and met Sebastien, the guide, who turned out to be a fan of Doctor Who and as a cosplay enthusiast who dressed up as David Tennant’s Doctor. On the way back I got terrible toothache as the result of an infection under a tooth on the lower left side of my mouth, which screamed to be taken out. I didn’t dare do that though, for fear that having it removed would make me sound like Daffy Duck right in the middle of making two radio programmes that were increasingly coming to mean a lot to me, personally. I waited until after they were made before having the tooth out, which meant suffering the pain for a couple of months. It’s gone now, which is a relief.

Anyway, I returned to Calais with Jonathan later in January and we met up with Sophie Tritz, a French journalist who turned out to be a brilliant fixer and great company. You can listen to the results here, but let me just say that the love story between Beatrice and her partner is extraordinary. So are the jaw-dropping, hardline things the Deputy Mayor of Calais says about migrants. Dover proved equally full of surprises. If you’d like to read more about either programme, I wrote a piece about Calais for the i newspaper and another about Dover here. The Walk: Across The Water was made by TBI Media on behalf of the BBC, with excellent sound work by Andy Partington. Thanks for your interest. I’ll post some photos of the trip below.

 

 

 

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The true story of The Boy Who Gave His Heart Away, a modern medical miracle, told live on stage

The Boy Who Gave His Heart Away, told live on stage

It’s my privilege to say that on Friday, February 9 I will be telling the incredibly moving true story of The Boy Who Gave His Heart Away on stage at the Birley Centre in Eastbourne, with some of the money raised on the night going to the Donor Family Network charity. Put on by Harry Farmer with excellent fellow writer Sheila Bugler part of the evening too. Please come if you can. Tickets are limited but they are available now from https://onlineticketseller.com/events/?id=1188&event=theboywhogavehisheartawaybycolemoreton

The Lost Cockney Voice returns to Radio 4

EastEnders ain’t Cockney no more says June Brown in The Lost Cockney Voice, first broadcast on Radio 4 last year. Now the documentary I made with producer Jonathan Mayo is back at 4pm on Tuesday 2 January 2018 (or on iPlayer right now).

IMG_0116You ’avin’ a laugh, mate? They don’t speak Cockney on EastEnders any more. That’s what June Brown says and she should know, having played the tough old bird with a heart of gold Dot Cotton in Albert Square for more than 30 years. “Slovenly speech, that’s what it is. I wouldn’t call it Cockney, no. They can’t help it, that’s how they speak,” she told me when I went to see her at home in Surrey. “It’s much more The Only Way Is Essex. That has become the Cockney of the times.”

She’s right, as I found out whilst making a documentary for Radio 4 called The Lost Cockney Voice. This isn’t about jellied eels and gentrification. I’m actually after a very specific lost voice: that of my grandmother Gladys and her generation. Gladys sounded half like a Cockney and half like the Queen. Women like her grew up during and after wartime in a vibrant East End culture but with the wireless as the source of news, entertainment and authority – and everyone on it spoke the Queen’s English, with accents that sound comically posh to us now. Nan and her mates developed this curious, one-generation voice that has almost vanished, because they’ve almost all passed away and their kids had other influences, like the telly.

I longed to hear that unique voice one more time, so I went looking to see if there was anyone in the East End still speaking like that – 
and on the way met some remarkable, inspiring people. Continue reading “The Lost Cockney Voice returns to Radio 4”

Reporting

Cole Moreton has covered some of the biggest breaking news stories of our time, from war and crime to sport and royal affairs.

Recent examples of this include the Paris attacks, HS2, Wonga and extensive reporting of the floods.

Conflict: 9/11 minute by minute in New York; The death of a soldier in Iraq; The scandal of Marine A in Afghanistan; Reliving the Falklands.

Crime: The disappearances of Milly Dowler, contrasting the reporting of Shannon Matthews and Madeleine McCann then April Jones; and The Ipswich murders. Still waiting for justice for Joanna Parrish, 25 years after her death.

Royalty: The royal weddingThe successionThe next coronation will be multi-faith.

Rural: Fox hunting carries on regardless; Hare coursing goes in for the kill; Farmers in crisis on the edge of despair; The Schmallenberg virusMilk protestsThe badger cull.

Eye Witness reports from the Clash of the Oligarchs, wrestling Kendo Nagasaki and the funeral of Bartley Gorman, bare knuckle champion of the world.

Sport: The Olympics & The Paralympics on home soil; The Godolphin scandal in horse racing and interviews with many leading figures including Frank LampardRory McIlroy and Tiger Woods.